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Tumor Marker Test

Tumor Marker Tests

Rp. 11.605.000

Only tests applicable to a patients condition will be given, all tests below are rarely needed by one patient. Priced per test. Results time varies.

Before, during, and after therapy, to detect cancer antigens in the blood, or to monitor tumor metastasis, such as:

AFP: (Alpha-fetoprotein) is a tumor marker designed to help detect and diagnose cancers of the liver,  testicles, and ovaries. This test is often ordered to monitor people with chronic liver diseases such as cirrhosis, chronic hepatitis B or hepatitis C because they have an increased lifetime risk of developing liver cancer. A healthcare practitioner may order an AFP test, along with imaging studies, to try to detect liver cancer when it is in its earliest and most treatable stages.

CA-125 (Cancer Antigen CA-125) : CA-125 is a protein present on the surface of most ovarian cancer cells. CA-125 is used to monitor treatment or detect recurrence of ovarian cancer. It is not typically used as a general screening test because levels can be elevated in other conditions such as normal menstruation, pregnancy, endometriosis, and pelvic inflammatory disease. CA 125 can also be detected in other cancers such as pancreas, liver, colon, breast, endometrial, fallopian tube, gastrointestinal, and lung. CA 125 is not intended as a screening test.

CA15-3 (Cancer Antigen CA 15-3). CA 15-3 is produced by cells in the breast and increased levels can be associated with breast cancer. Rarely increased in early breast cancer, it may be used to detect recurrence of cancer in women following treatment or mastectomy and to monitor treatment for women with advanced breast cancer. However, adenocarcinomas of the ovary, lung, colon, and pancreas also express elevated CA 15-3 levels. Noncancerous conditions sometimes associated with elected CA 15-3 include benign breast or ovarian disease, endometriosis, pelvic inflammatory disease, and hepatitis. Pregnancy and lactation are also
related to high CA 15-3 levels.

CA19-9 (Cancer Antigen CA 19-9). For patients with digestive tract or intra-abdominal carcinomas such as colorectal cancer, pancreatic cancer, stomach cancer and bile duct cancer. Not all pancreatic cancer patients will test positive with this test.

CA 72-4 (Cancer Antigen 72-4). The most sensitive of tumor markers for digestive cancers. CA 72-4 is generally a marker of advanced disease, rather than a marker for screening for the detection of early disease. After curative healing, CA 72-4 could be used to monitor recurrence or metastasis in those cases that had elevated levels prior to surgery. Elevated levels are preferentially found in gastric cancer patients, but can also be found in certain benign diseases like pneumonia, pancreatitis, liver cirrhosis and ovarian cysts. The most important advantage of CA 72-4 is its particularly high diagnostic specificity for benign.

CEA (Carcinoemobyonic Antigen) is a measurement of blood plasma. It is very non-specific and can be increased in many types of cancer, gastrointestinal, colorectal, ovarian, bladder, cervical, stomach, kidney, lung, pancreatic, liver, prostate, thyroid, melanoma, lymphoma, and breast. People with non-cancerous  conditions, such as cirrhosis or peptic disease, or inflammatory intestinal conditions such as colitis or  diverticulitis may also have increased levels.

SCC (Squamous Cell Carcinoma Antigen). First identified in cervical cancer. It is a marker for squamous cell cancers, which can occur in the cervix, head and neck, lung, and skin. Levels of SCC can be used as an aid to stage the carcinoma and to determine the response to the treatment.

Other Tumor Marker tests not listed above may also be available on request.